Researchers from across the southeast will present their work on Friday, March 3, 2017.  Environmental education and Environmental Science based presentations and posters will be featured to share results, methods, lessons learned and problems encountered. 

Morning Sessions (9:30 am - 11:30 am)

9:30 -9:55 am    Differences and Similarities in the Metrics Used to Determine Benthic Macroinvertebrate Scores in Eight Southeastern States - Don Lane     An introduction as to how Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Georgia, Florida, North Carolina, and South Carolina determine their respective macroinvertebrate indexes with an emphasis on their respective similarities and differences.

10:00 -10:25 am   Creating a new measure of Environmental Literacy for Adolescents - Rachel Szczytko   Researchers at NC State have developed a new, concise measure of environmental literacy for adolescents that is appropriate for both formal and informal settings. Come learn about the scale development process and how it has been utilized in North Carolina schools.

10:30 -10:55 am   Intergenerational Transfer: Can the “trickle-up” effect of information be used to increase environmental literacy? - Danielle Lawson    While environmental education efforts focused on children invest in our future, reaching adults, while challenging, remains critical as actions today will impact tomorrow. We will review recent research focused on identifying the how to effectively integrate intergenerational transfer in environmental education efforts in order to reach adults as well as children.

11:00 -11:25 am   Utilizing Snorkeling to Address Research Questions for Fishes in Southern Appalachia - Part One - Johnathan Davis   This program discusses the research and educational opportunities provided by snorkeling experiences available in north Georgia and southern Appalachia and presents recent research that utilized snorkeling and visual observation as sampling methods.  Additional findings on the imperiled sicklefin redhorse will be discussed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




























Poster Sessions (during lunch)


Which is the Most Accurate Predictor for Macroinvertebrate Communities:
Impervious Surface vs. Streamside Land Use? - Chris Kodani
    This study examined the effects of land use type and impervious surface on the macroinvertebrate communities at 20 locations.  A watershed’s impervious surface area proved to be a more reliable predictor of the stream’s macroinvertebrate community than a study site’s land use type. 

Climate change education and environmental education:  knowledge, barriers, and perceptions among environmental educators in the Southeastern United States - Lauren Johnson

  This research focuses on the level of perception, knowledge, and barriers from environmental educators in the Southeastern United States. 
The Influence of a Zoo Summer Camp Experience on Children's Environmental and Conservational Attitudes - Emily Orbison   The purpose of this study was to determine how an immersive, five-day summer program at a zoo affects children’s attitudes about the environment as well as self-efficacy for conservation behaviors. This study used the Children's Attitudes Toward the Environment Scale with seven to nine-year-old participants.























Afternoon Sessions (1:10 pm - 4:30 pm)


1:10 -1:30 pm      Understanding Student Mindset around Sustainability and Food Insecurity at the Clarke Middle School Garden - Andie Bisceglia      Edible school gardens have experienced resurgence in popularity nationwide since the 1990s, and have received much attention on their potential as a tool for combatting food insecurity and promoting sustainability.  Drawing on a year’s worth of mixed-methods research conducted at the Clarke Middle School garden in Athens, GA, this presentation will include a brief overview of their garden program, and then demonstrate our findings on how students think about sustainability and food insecurity in their community and what implications this has for teachers who want to use school gardens as a tool for environmental, social, and economic food system transformation. 

1:35 -1:55 pm   Clemson WOW Project: success and effectiveness of an outreach program - Erica Linard   What’s in Our Waters (WOW) high school outreach program designed by graduate students at Clemson University has been successfully implemented in a few after school environmental clubs and a local high school AP environmental science course, allowing students to have hands on experience with the scientific method while learning the importance of responsible citizen science. Current research also suggests that this program can alter students’ perceptions of science and scientists.

2:00 -2:20 pm   Environmental Ed in Middle School Ag: The Weird, the Nasty, and the Awesome - Debbie Mitchell

  This photo-journal program of middle school students engaging in environmental education during Agriculture Science class will highlight lessons learned by a teacher in her first four years of teaching. There are great lessons in throwing caution to the wind and doing things the "wrong way" first.

2:25 -2:45 pm   The Environmental Worldviews of NC Certified Environmental Educators - Holly Denham   Research using one of the most commonly used measures of environmental worldviews, the New Ecological Paradigm Scale; found that the overall group score of North Carolina Certified Environmental Educators showed only slightly above average agreement with the pro-environmental paradigm.  Are these educators really ambivalent about the environment or does the diversity of the sample reflect something else?

2:45 -2:55 pm

  Break    
2:55 -3:15 pm   Teaching future environmental educators how to conduct a quantitative survey: An example with results - Dr. Kris Irwin   Participants will examine the methodology employed by a team of college students to construct, implement, and analyze data collected using an electronic survey. The objective of the survey was to determine teachers' knowledge and attitudes about using an aquaponics recirculating system as a teaching tool.
3:20 -3:40 pm   Developing SMARTist! - Dr. Gretchen Jones Torbert   Developing Science and Mathematics through the arts, recreation and technology with the instructional time. The teaching of students to enjoy the learning of both Science and Math together.

3:45 -4:05 pm   Utilizing Snorkeling to Address Research Questions for Fishes in Southern Appalachia - Part Two - Johnathan Davis

  This program discusses the research and educational opportunities provided by snorkeling experiences available in north Georgia and southern Appalachia and presents recent research that utilized snorkeling and visual observation as sampling methods.  Additional findings on the imperiled sicklefin redhorse will be discussed.